The Brain and Alcohol | Genetic Predisposition

The Brain and Alcohol | Genetic Predisposition

Let’s talk about science and alcohol.  It’s a pretty interesting and popular subject when the topic of recovery and sobriety gets brought up.  

 

But let’s keep in mind that it’s not enough to rely on science and information to ditch the booze. Yes, it’s interesting and knowledge is power, but please don’t solely rely on knowledge, science and information alone to quit drinking. If we could read or listen ourselves out of a drinking problem, well, the problem would be solved. 🪄🦄

 

Paul loves the science part of addiction and recently did a podcast intro on just that. (RE Episode 396)  

 

Paul got most of his info from a fantastic podcast episode from the Huberman Lab Podcast, What Alcohol Does to Your Brain, Body & Health| Episode 86.   I highly recommend you check it out and listen when you get a chance…Dr. Huberman goes into great detail in this 2 hour episode and even those without a drinking problem will find it interesting and beneficial.  

 

Andrew Huberman, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist and tenured Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

 

Alcohol and the brain. 🥃🧠

 

Alcohol has many biochemical and neurochemical effects on the brain. There are dramatic changes in the neurons that control the release of serotonin when we consume alcohol. Serotonin is the feel good chemical and 80% of it is created in the gut. When we mix alcohol and serotonin it gets converted into acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde damages your DNA and prevents your body from repairing the damage.  A toxic buildup of acetaldehyde can increase your cancer risk.

 

This acetaldehyde acts as a toxin at the very synapses and the connections between the serotonergic neurons and lots of other neurons. In other words, when we ingest alcohol, the toxic effects of alcohol disrupt those mood circuitries.

It does this first ☝🏼by making them hyper active. 

 

This is why people become happy or more talkative after a couple of sips of alcohol.  But when the alcohol wears off the serotonin levels and the activity of brain circuits really start to drop and this is why most people head to the bar for a second round. Now typically what happens when people ingest their 3rd, 4th or 5th drink, there is an absolute zero chance of them recovering that energized mood they experienced on the first drink. Most people, when they drink more and more, begin to feel suppressed 🫤. The front part of the brain, the frontal cortex, is starting to shut down.  The motor areas of the brain that control motion and basic functions begin to slow. 

 

This is the slurred speech, the swaying back and forth, the classic drunk shuffle. People begin to lean on things, uncomfortable benches seem like a good place to spend the night. There is a great depression, not of the psychiatry sort, but a depression of alertness and arousal, and eventually people begin to pass out. 🥱

 

Here’s one big way that alcohol changes your brain chemistry.  

 

Alcohol changes the relationship between the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland and the adrenals.  The hypothalamus, which is about the size of a gumball and sits above the roof of the mouth, provides a specific set of signals for the pituitary gland…which then releases hormones into the bloodstream that go and talk to you adrenals which sit right above your kidneys in your lower back. The adrenals release a chemical called epinephrine and cortisol which is involved in the longer term stress response. 

 

The hypothalamus, the pituitary gland and the adrenals maintain the physiological balance of what you perceive as stressful.   People who consistently drink are more stressed out at baseline then sober peeps. They have more cortisol released from their adrenal glands even when they are not drinking. And a consequence of this is they feel more stressed and feel more anxiety when they are not drinking. Most medical professionals will agree that stress is the number one contributor to disease.

 

Let’s talk about blackouts for a second. Blacking out is not passing out. When we overload the brain with alcohol, it’s almost too much to process and the activity of neurons in the hippocampus, which is involved with memory formation, are strained and then they completely shut off. As in you no longer form memories. You are still awake and can still be functioning, some high functioning, but the memory forming part of your brain, the hippocampus, clocks out.

 

Now…to genetic predisposition…

Side note, Paul doesn’t believe in genetic predisposition to alcoholism. He used to, but now he doesn’t.  

Addiction guru Dr. Gabor Mate’s teaching rebukes the genetic myth. Dr. Mate feels all addictions are trauma responses. What helped Dr. Mate reach this conclusion was his studying of twins who have the same genetic makeup.  He also studies twins with the same genetic makeup who are separated at birth. His conclusion is that all addictions are environmental responses, or coping behaviors that allow people to survive in unhealthy environments.

Dr. Bruce Lipton, who is coined the father of Epigenetics in the 90’s, would also agree with this. Epigenetics says it’s the environment that controls the expression of genes and gene mutations. In addition, it’s the environment that cues anxiety, depression, addiction, auto immune responses, cancers, inflammations, and not genetics. The classic Rat Park experiment by Bruce Alexander in the 70’s also shows addictions are environmental. 

 

Paul says, “I am on board with this approach and even in the past 8 years doing Recovery Elevator, I’ve seen the pendulum slightly shift in this direction.”   What we’re seeing now, is our biological makeup is much more adaptive and reflexive to environments than previously thought. Again, Paul feels, most addictions are trauma based. They are adaptive behaviors. Another reason he doesn’t think alcoholism is genetic is because alcoholism is rapidly on the rise. Gene’s take thousands, millions of years to evolve. Gene’s can’t explain the ten fold increase in alcoholism we’ve seen in the last couple centuries.

 

That being said, we do want to share different perspectives on alcoholism. 

 

Dr. Huberman feels alcoholism is genetic. He does mention that there is no blood test, fingerprint test, or bio marker to indicate this addiction gene.  Dr. Huberman says the best way to “identify” alcoholics and non alcoholics is by putting drinkers in two bins. One bin is the group of people who have a couple of drinks and then get tired with a nodding head, or they feel sedated. The other bin of people is the group that has a couple of drinks and gets energized and are not sedated. The drowsy group after a couple drinks are your normal drinkers. The let’s go streaking in the quad and bring your green hat group are the future alcoholics.

 

Is it genetic based, or trauma based. Most likely it isn’t 100% one or the other.  It’s most likely a combination of 57,680 different things.

 

Again, we don’t recommend getting too caught up in all this. At the end of the day, you’ve got a drinking problem. Knowing what alcohol does to your prefrontal cortex isn’t going to keep you sober in the long run. 

 

Find what works for you…and go with that!

***Taken from Recovery Elevator Podcast, episode 396, host Paul Churchill***

 

BYO Mocktail: Tamarind Agua Fresca

BYO Mocktail: Tamarind Agua Fresca

At this point it sounds cliche, 2022 has been an a$$ kicker of a year. I’m very tired, but I’m also very sober, still. Sober because I was lucky enough to have built a large toolbox which I relied on a lot this year. When I tell you that I used ever single tool in there… I am not lying.

2022 has been the year I almost drank.

Best night ever
Fangwell judging me and also probably you.

 

For the most part I hang out with my pets and my husband. But among the highlights was a cruise to Alaska and I went to Bozeman to hang out with my sober friends, who are now like family.

Returning home, all I want to do is spend the long days of the end of summer on my back porch drinking something fancy and refreshing.

 

Recovery Elevator Mocktail Blog

 

Therefore, I keep my mixing simple and to the point. I used fruit to keep it sweet and a topper of your choice of seltzer makes it unique!

 

Best night ever

 

 

Tamarind Mango Agua Fresca (AF)

Serves 2
Prep time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1⁄2 cup Tamarind Nectar
  • 1 t Tamarind puree
  • 1⁄2 cup frozen mango
  • 1 t honey
  • 2T Tajin
  • Fizzy water (your choice of flavor)
To make the drink

1- In a blender place the nectar, puree and frozen mango. Blend until smooth.

2- Rub the honey along the rim of the glasses and then dip the edges into Tajin.

3- Divide the mixture evenly and top with the fizzy water.

 

Sangria

 

Love and Mocktails,

Kate

BYO Mocktail: Pineapple Basil Lemonade

BYO Mocktail: Pineapple Basil Lemonade

One of the scariest questions I had during my path to sobriety was: How will I celebrate ANYTHING? How will I toast at my wedding?

Am I allowed to celebrate anymore ever?!

Best night ever

 

 

I was married for the first time in 2005, I was young, figuring out my career and had spent the previous 2 years as a bartender. So I had my best bartender friend (hi ash!) write us a signature cocktail. Seventeen years later, all I can remember is that it was called “The True Love”, had a champagne floater and I drank many of them.

 

Recovery Elevator Mocktail Blog

My young bride self preparing myself to drink heavily.

 

The name of that drink rang true, because what I was really in love with was the alcohol. I wasn’t able to love myself, let alone anyone else at that time. Alcohol was my true love, it was the celebration. I had the ability to turn a Monday afternoon into a celebration, because of booze.

 

Best night ever
Best night ever

 

I’ve come to learn over time and with therapy, yes, those that are alcohol free do celebrate! It has also come to light that we celebrate harder because we are fully present in the moment. This month, in honor of Paul Churchill getting married, I’m dedicating this mocktail to his bride. A reinvention of The True Love  because this time, it actually is true love.

 

Recovery Elevator Mocktail Blog

 

 

The True Love: Pineapple Basil Lemonade (AF)

Serves 4
Prep time: 30 minutes + cooling time

Ingredients

  • 1 pineapple, cored, chopped & divided
  • 1 T cinnamon
  • 1⁄2 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 T honey
  • 10 basil leaves
  • 2 1/2 cups pineapple water (see below)
  • Ice
Pineapple water

Boil 3 cups water, add pineapple peel, rough chopped and cinnamon. Boil 20 minutes, strain liquid through sieve. Allow to cool.

To make the drink

1- In a blender place the pineapple, pineapple water, lemon juice & honey. Blend until smooth.

2- Add in basil and pulse a few times to chop up the basil.

Garnish with pineapple if you want!

Sangria
 

Love and Mocktails,

Kate

What is Sober?

What is Sober?

 

What is sober?  What is sobriety?  Can we define this? Let’s try!

 

Sober.  First off this word can be exchanged with AF, Alcohol-free, whatever. But what is sober?

 

When we say sober, at least for this blog, we are referring to alcohol.

 

(That’s the drink that put Paul behind the mic 🎙).

 

This topic, especially in the rooms of AA and 12 step programs, can be somewhat divisive.  👊🏼👊🏼  But…the truth of the matter is, it really shouldn’t be.  I think we’ll find out that arguing over what sober IS, and ISN’T, is a silly and almost harmful endeavor. 

 

In fact there are even nicknames for what type of sober you are. 🙃

Our recommendation is don’t get too attached to any idea of what sober looks like, because at the end of the day, it’s not really about the substances, behaviors or actions…

 

it’s the freedom that you have from them. 🦅

 

Do your absolute best not judge others for their definition of sober because as we’ll find out, it’s not as black and white as you think. 

 

Quick side note about judgements 👉🏼 When you judge others you judge yourself (thank you boomerang 🪃 effect), and create separation.

 

In terms of sobriety, Paul has heard some silly stories about people being told they aren’t sober because they drink kombucha, they drink NA beers, or they had beer battered fish and chips for lunch. True story.  Never-mind mind the fact a ripe banana 🍌 has the same amount of alcohol as kombucha and a hamburger bun has nearly triple that.  Are you not sober if you eat a banana or a hamburger or chicken sandwich? 

 

When Paul first quit drinking and began going to AA he thought it was no alcohol, no drugs, no substances, no pills, no prescriptions, no mind altering substances, no MDMA, no mushrooms, the list can go on and on…  

 

But, welcome to the real world, where there are approximately 50 shades of gray, and just as many shades of ‘sober’.   

 

Here are some statements Paul has heard from sober people.
  • “I’m sober, and I drink Kombucha.”
  • “I’m sober, and I drink NA Beers.”
  • “I’m sober, and I eat dishes that are prepared with some form of alcohol.”
  • “I’m sober, and I smoke cigarettes.”
  • “I’m sober, and I use chewing tobacco.”
  • “I’m sober, and I drink 1-10 cups of coffee a day.”  
  • “I’m sober, and take ADHD meds.” 
  • “I’m sober, and take antidepressants.”
  • “I’m sober, and I use cannabis.”  (This has been coined California Sober.)
  • “I’m sober, and I take benzos for my anxiety and sleep.”   
  • “I’m sober, and take opiates for chronic pain.”
  • “I’m sober, and I take sleep meds.” 
  • “I’m sober, and I pull out my eyebrows, I itch, pick and pull.”
  • “I’m sober, and I use plant medicine.”  (Ayahuasca, psilocybin, ketamine, MDMA)
  • “I’m sober, and I have to sexually relieve myself constantly.”
  • “I’m sober, and I eat a fuck ton of ice cream.”
  • “I’m sober, and I love to shop.”
  • “I’m sober and I leave this planet while doing Breathwork or Tai Chi.”

 

Paul has even heard people say, I’m sober, but…they have a couple drinks a year, month, or even in a given week.

 

As you can see, defining sobriety is a fool’s errand. We can’t do it, and we shouldn’t do it. In fact it’s dangerous to do so. If we did, we’d separate, isolate and disconnect ourselves even more.

 

We’re also ignoring the environment we have to live in. We unnecessarily beat ourselves up for not hitting our internal definition of sober. In a meeting one time Paul heard a guy say that he wasn’t sober because he was taking sleep meds. It was consuming him. We, of course, don’t exactly know what his relationship with the meds was like…if he was taking them ‘as prescribed’…but sleep is fucking important. Paul had to take AF Sleep-Eze, and Tylenol PM’s for probably 4-6 months when he first quit drinking. If you don’t get good sleep, the foundation of your sobriety is compromised.  

 

Okay, so those are some Newtonian ways to define sobriety. Those are more about staying away from something, or coming at it from a lens of sacrifice.

 

Here are some better ways. 🙌🏼
  • Sobriety is freedom.
  • Sobriety is everything.
  • Sobriety is living authentically.
  • Sobriety is not being a slave to a substance, behavior or action. 
  • Sobriety is you living your life how you want to live.
  • Sobriety is living with a connected head and heart.
  • Sobriety is being able to recognize beauty, art, and appreciate sunsets.
  • Sobriety is a different vibration.
  • Sobriety is hope.
  • Sobriety is you taking off the chains.
  • Sobriety is you…meeting you.
  • Sobriety is a manageable life.
  • Sobriety is “downgrading additions.” Sarah Hepola – Blackout 

 

If you remove alcohol and aren’t ready to say goodbye to everything else, go slow, take your time, and listen to your body. There is no right or wrong way to do this, and there is no generally accepted definition of sobriety. 

 

So then what?  Do we have to accept them all?  Well, just like it’s a good idea to accept all skin colors, it’s the same with defining sobriety. What really matters here is the person is trying to make a change.  Even if the change is a mental thought form swirling in the brain, it still is something that exists.

 

We’re going to make this simple, at Recovery Elevator, we accept all versions of sober. We accept all versions of you. 

 

***Taken from Recovery Elevator Podcast, episode 380, host Paul Churchill*** 

 

 

BYO Mocktail- Keeping a Gingerly Tempo (AF)

BYO Mocktail- Keeping a Gingerly Tempo (AF)

The other day I was texting with a longtime friend, just the usual, sometimes nonsensical, back and forth of friends who have a solid foundation. While she was catching me up on her husband and son, she mentioned that her son’s favorite mocktail right now is a Don Johnson. Being a curious person, I took the bait and asked “What’s a Don Johnson?” 

It’s a Miami vice with no socks! (🚫rum)

Best night ever

 

And then I snorted so hard with laughter, I scared my cat. But this got me thinking about the mocktail traditions I had as a kid. I believe that we all experience exposure to alcohol in our youth and it begins to form the values we have around alcohol. 

 

Recovery Elevator Mocktail Blog

 

My family mocktail was a Shirley Temple. On Saturday evenings my father would make my mother a Campari and soda and then for us kids, a Shirley Temple. We would then sit dow as a family and have a little pre-dinner chat. As an adult I can see what my (extremely tired) parents were doing. They wanted us to sit down and talk to them, but also not have to exert a lot of energy at the same time.

 

Best night ever

 

To this day, I love to sit and have a pre-dinner drink. I find it the best way to quiet my busy mind. I used to think that I needed vodka to also quiet my mind, but I know better. So in keeping with traditions established in our youth, I’m updating the Shirley Temple, adding in some ginger and lime to spice it up, but keep it fun without the booze.

Recovery Elevator Mocktail Blog

 

 

Keeping a Gingerly Tempo (AF)

Serves 4
Prep time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 cups Ginger Beer
  • 1 cup sparkling water
  • 3 T lime juice
  • 3 T grenadine
  • cherry and limes for garnish

Combine all ingredients (except garnish) pitcher. Stir together. Put 2 cherries in the bottom of the glass. Pour over crushed ice (my ice maker has decided to stop making crushed ice, please trust me, crushed is best!)

Sangria

 

Love and Mocktails,

Kate

PS- When I told the friend she was the opening subject of my blog, she wanted me to add the following “Your friend is an aspiring film writer with a penchant for tennis skirts and an endearing laugh. She tells amazing jokes.”

BYO Mocktail: St. Patrick’s Day-Rita

BYO Mocktail: St. Patrick’s Day-Rita

Normally I post my mocktail around the 15th of the month, but this month I delayed my post for 2 days so we could talk about

St. Patrick’s Day…

Ready?! Let’s go!

Recovery Elevator Mocktail Blog

 

When alcohol is a central focus in your life, every day can be seen as a day to drink! For me, when “drinking holidays” arrived, this was truly my time to shine. It was when everyone else drank like I did on the daily! I could be me, I could be free…. I could have a 3 day hangover… I could have UBI bruises (Unidentified Beer Incident)… I could have lost a phone… I could have…

In Cafe RE this week, someone posted about how in the past they used to drink to their Great Granny O’Reilly and tell everyone at the bar about their Irish heritage. Until they did an ancestry test and discovered they are only 2% Irish! I assume if you’re here, you are thinking about cutting out alcohol, so I feel comfortable asking: How many times have you convinced yourself that something was true to justify the way you were drinking?

 

Best night ever

 

As we step away from alcohol, we have to build our own tool belt of sobriety tips and tricks to whip out at a moments notice. My biggest tool (and the whole reason I’m here writing this mocktail blog!) is:

 

BYO MOCKTAIL!

Having your own drink is, to me, by far the most important thing when socializing. And St. Patrick’s Day can be a doozie! Everything is green, everyone it seems is drunk and you can almost feel the bad decisions being made.

Who wants a green treat to bring to their best friend’s, brother’s, dog babysitter’s, plant sitter’s, cousin’s, co-worker’s St. Patrick’s Day party?!

 

Recovery Elevator Mocktail Blog

 

 

The St. Patrick’s Day-Rita (AF)

Serves 1
Prep time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 celery stalk, rough chopped (save the leaves for garnish!)
  • 2 oz (1/4c) lime juice
  • 1 oz (2T) orange juice
  • 2 oz (1/4 c) simple syrup
  • celery salt for rim

Combine first 4 ingredients in blender and blend until celery is puréed. Strain through cheesecloth or dish cloth, reserving liquid & pressing liquid through. Put liquid back into blender, add a handful of ice and blend. Rim the glass with celery salt and pour into glass. Garnish with celery leaves and drink!

Sangria

 

Love and Mocktails,

Kate

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